The year in clinical sexuality, 2011.

As we get ready to leave 2011 behind, I would like as always to express my gratitude to family, friends and colleagues for your support and encouragement over the past year; and to my patients for your trust and confidence. May we all merit much happiness in 2012. Here’s my list of 2011′s most interesting …

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Kissing, Part 3 — Why stop?

I have been actively looking for the answer to why people stop kissing. I love research, particularly medical and psychological journals, because I love to read and I really like to know the answers to why things are the way they are. After searching literally everywhere, I found almost nothing. I can find statistics on …

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More about orgasms.

Mary Roach, author of Bonk (which you should read if you have the time…I have a review of the book somewhere on this blog!), does a 15 minute review of 10 Things You Should Know About Orgasm. Okay…you might be able to live without all 10 but I found the clip amusing and yes…a tad …

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Kissing Part 2 — Anatomy of a kiss.

“Human lips enjoy the slimmest layer of skin on the human body, and the lips are among the most densely populated with sensory neurons of any body region. When we kiss the neurons, along with those in the tongue and mouth, rocket messages to the brain and body, setting off delightful sensations, intense emotions and …

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Kissing Part 1 — How often do you kiss?

A recent survey conducted by the British Heart Foundation found that, “one in five (18%) married people don’t pucker-up with their partner for an entire week, while two in five married people (40%) kiss for just five seconds or less when they get it on. Apparently Scots kiss the longest, for 28 seconds. And East …

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The “Glee” controversy.

Amy Schalet, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, has a great post responding to the Glee episode where two of its main characters decide to have sex for the first time. Quote taken from the post, “Why did it takes us so long to arrive at a positive media portrayal of …

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Faking it.

Many theories exist about why one might fake an orgasm. In a recent study discussed on CBS News, a researcher at Columbia University found that women fake it to retain their mates. Dr Kaighobadi, who conducted the study (the study can be found in the November issue of the Archives of Sexual Behavior), calls it …

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